I am currently working on a longish post about using Twitter in academia, but in the meantime I have collected some useful links to peruse.

  • First up Big Think. Think of YouTube for ideas. The polish on this site is nice, and it seems to be off to a good start with some rather substantial names being interviewed on camera. Moby, Kurt Anderson, Jimmy Wales, Steven Pinker . . .This is probably a good resource to use as a discussion starter for your classes.
  • I talk a great deal here about file formats (never send me a .doc). One of the frequent questions people have, particularly those on a PC, is how to manipulate a .pdf. Tinkernut has a fabulous, short, screen tutorial on manipulating pdfs. The tools he recommends are all PC based, but you can do similar things with a Mac.
  • A couple of days ago Lifehacker ran a post on obscure Google tricks. There is a lot of hidden functionality built into Google of which even heavy internet users are often not aware. For example, converting currency for those overseas academic ventures, or using it to ID foreign words.
  • Howard Rheingold of Smart Mobs fame, is teaching a course on social media. As part of the class he has collected an extensive list of RSS resources.
  • Finally, for those in history, the Center for New Media and History out of George Mason University has launched a new project: Echo. Echo is an online directory for the collection of information on the history of science and technology.